IMG_0104.JPG

About Jack

Jack Rice is a criminal defense trial lawyer who provides legal advice to those charged with crimes in Federal and Minnesota State courtrooms.

 

I'm Jack Rice, Trial Lawyer.


Standing in front of a jury of twelve people can be daunting. They walk into a courtroom and when hearing it is a criminal case, they automatically assume the defendant's guilt or the police wouldn't have brought them here. So much for the presumption of innocence, right? 

I've seen this happen over and over, before countless juries I have stood in front of. This illustrates a simple point: Are you another guilty defendant standing between a jury and their lunch, or are you a person—a person who didn't do what the government claims you did?

Trial work is not easy and the stakes are monumental for the person charged. To put it simply, if convicted, their entire life changes. A person goes from being an individual to being a criminal. It can mean jail. It can mean prison. After all, it's a completely different world. Try getting a job, let alone a decent one with benefits to support your family. Try renting, or finding any place to live that gives you the comfort and privacy you deserve. Try starting a business. Unfortunately, the list of "tries" goes on and on and on.

I am a criminal defense trial lawyer, but am not simply that. First and foremost, I'm a storyteller. I always have been and my desire for the full picture started long before I went to law school. This skill is the most important tool in my toolbox because I have the chance to construct a lens through which a juror sees the world. I then have the chance to create that world for them throughout a trial. This way, as they look at "the facts", they can see them from our point of view rather than the point of view of the government.  

I learned this skill as a young man but refined this as a Central Intelligence Agency Officer. My job, which required similar skills, was to motivate people to do things. I needed to create a world where driving them to do things made sense to them. This is exactly what I do as a criminal defense trial lawyer. I convince the juror and jury as a whole that the world I create is their world, and then overlay the facts to provide a reason for then to find my clients "not guilty."

I understand the government's role. Heck, I was the government. I used to prosecute people in Minnesota for crimes and I have put them in jail and prison. I know how the government does what they do. This can be incredibly helpful because it allows me to anticipate their next moves and prepare. This experience can be critical to a case.

Thousands of new lawyers graduate from school and get their licenses every year. Many of them call themselves trial lawyers, but are they? My experience comes from a multitude of experiences, some of which can't be duplicated by others in my field.

If I sound like the trial lawyer you are looking for, let's talk.